BeeDictionary's Blog

Eminent and imminent are two different words that sound so alike. A small mistake on our part in its usage and the entire sentence and thought could go wrong. For example – I could foresee the eminent danger. What would you think of when you got to hear something like this? I would be stunned for sure.

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De facto – means ‘concerning fact’, ‘in fact’, ‘actually’. It comes from the Latin word ‘de fakto’. This word is usually used in legal language and means ‘in practice but not necessarily ordained by law’.

A few examples are given below:

  1. Smith became the de facto head of the family soon after h...

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Idioms or polemic phrases are some of the commonly used interchangeably by many, without actually knowing their actual meaning and usage. Idioms are a combination of words that have a figurative meaning, whereas a phrase is a combination of words that have a literal meaning. Here are some examples o...

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Glower means an angry stare. This word originates from the Scottish word ‘glowren’ meaning ‘to look intently’ or ‘to stare in amazement’.

This word has been used since the late Middle ages, with the meaning changing over to mean ‘staring with anger’ by the late 1700’s. Here’s how you can u...

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Blandish – means to coax using flattery

This present word is derived from the French word ‘blandir’ which means to ‘soothe’ or ‘flatter’. You can use these words in many ways; some of them are given below.

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