BeeDictionary's Blog

Have you ever wondered about the longest word in the English language? I grew curious after I heard the word lymphosarcoma. Actually, Amitabh Bachhan of Bollywood famously diagnosed Rajesh Khanna with ‘lymphosarcoma of the intestine’ in a touching Bollywood movie called ‘Anand’. That’s how I came to know about lymphosarcoma. It turns out that the longest word in the English language depends upon what words form part of your investigation. Are you including only such words that are derived naturally from the language’s roots? Are you allowing words that have been formed by coinage and construction? Are you considering place names and technical terms? Now, technical terms can be as long as you want. Also, the units of measurement can even differ. Length can be measured by the number of written letters in a word or the number of phonemes in that word.

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Antonyms are synonymous with opposites but they have a more restricted meaning. They are word pairs that have opposite meaning, that lie on a continuous spectrum. They can be divided into:

  1. Graded antonyms – These are words that have meanings that lie on a continuous spectrum Example – hot and...

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Some words have been abused so much in the Corporate World that they have become a joke. They just don’t mean anything anymore. Also, there is corporatese (here I go again, trying to mimic a pattern to invent a word; if there can be legalese why can’t there be coporatese?) where words are masqueraded as metaphors and idioms of life by tweaking (tweaking is another ugh!) their usage.  But with overuse these notional words have degenerated to jargon. Here is a list compiled by David Silverman of Harvard Business Review. He gives the primordial meanings of these words. My own favorite, which did not make to David’s list, is ‘proactive’. I have added proactive in the end

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Some words have been abused so much in the Corporate World that they have become a joke. They just don’t mean anything anymore. Also, there is corporatese (here I go again, trying to mimic a pattern to invent a word; if there can be legalese why can’t there be coporatese?) where words are masqueraded as metaphors and idioms of life by tweaking (tweaking is another ugh!) their usage.  But with overuse these notional words have degenerated to jargon. Here is a list compiled by David Silverman of Harvard Business Review. He gives the primordial meanings of these words. My own favorite, which did not make to David’s list, is ‘proactive’. I have added proactive in the end

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We have all come across various names for words, sentences, phrases etc. Metaphor is one such name given to a figure of speech that describes the subject by asserting that it is on some part of comparison the same as another. Confusing? In simple and easy language it means 2 things are being compared without the use of words – ‘like’ or ‘as’. We have all come across the famous statement – all the world’s a stage. This is a metaphor that compares our life to a stage.

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